Daniel Andrews announces $ 14.3 m more for multicultural communities, calling the pandemic the biggest challenge we ever had to face

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By SAT News Desk

MELBOURNE, 13 August 2020: The Victorian Government is boosting support for multicultural communities across the state so that all Victorians can play their part, help slow the spread of coronavirus, and stay safe.

Describing the pandemic as a ‘great challenge’ Premier Daniel Andrews today announced an additional $14.3 million to reach out to more culturally and linguistically diverse Victorians and ensure they get the support they need, when they need it.

Premier Daniel Andrews told a virtual multicultural media conference today, “We are equal to this task, but it will only work if each and every Victorian plays their part – we’ve got to look out for each other.”
“This is one of the biggest challenges we’ve ever had to face, but by supporting one another, staying home and
slowing the spread of this deadly virus, we’ll get through to the other side,”he said.

The funding includes $6.9 million for expanded health messaging and support for multicultural organizations that work on the ground to deliver emergency relief, such as culturally specific accommodation and food for those self-isolating or in quarantine.

It will also ensure positive cases and their close contacts are cared for and taken through compliance checks in a culturally appropriate way, while also providing cultural advice to support the work of the coronavirus contact tracing team.

A CALD Communities Taskforce will also be established to help multicultural and multifaith communities through the pandemic, with representatives from the Victorian Multicultural Commission and various departments.

The funding package also includes $5.5 million to continue and expand the distribution of vital health advice that has been translated into 55 different languages, ensuring people understand and comply with restrictions designed to keep us safe, with a focus on supporting younger CALD members.

Support for multicultural communities has been rolling out since the beginning of the pandemic, with advertising campaigns on TV, social media, digital platforms, newspapers, and radio, as well as a series of community roundtables.

The latest in-language videos released earlier this week feature frontline health workers speaking about their experiences in Oromo, Vietnamese, Turkish, and Korean.

A further $2 million will go towards translation and interpreter services to meet the increase in demand.

This latest investment builds on the $11.3 million package that was announced in May to help multicultural and multifaith Victorians battle social isolation, engage young people and fund culturally specific family violence support agencies.

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