Tag: Adani Australia coal project

Protests in Australia & globally to halt $1b SBI loan for Adani coal project

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By SAT News Desk

MELBOURNE, 20 November 2020: Hundreds joined the StopAdani rallies across the country and around the globe today, calling on the State Bank of India to rule out an almost $1billion loan to Adani for the controversial Carmichael coal project in Queensland.

Indian media has reported that the state-owned bank is close to finalizing the $1billion loan, prompting a rapid response from climate campaigners across the globe who have opposed the proposed coal project for over a decade.

Rallies in Sydney and Melbourne were held at State Bank of India offices and at the Indian consulate in Brisbane and the Indian High Commission in Canberra. Campaigners delivered a letter from the investor action group Market Forces, calling on the state-owned bank to give assurances they will not use Indian taxpayers’ money to turbocharge global warming by supporting Adani’s coal project.

In Wellington, New Zealand campaigners hand-delivered a letter to the Indian High Commission and met with a representative to urge the Indian government not to support the state-owned bank’s loan to Adani’s coal mine.

In New York, USA campaigners hand-delivered a letter to the SBI office and met with the NYC State Bank of India Vice President to convey their concerns about the bank financing Adani’s coal project.

In Suva, Fijian campaigners hand-delivered a letter to the Indian High Commission, calling on them to stop the State Bank of India loan to Adani’s coal mine, which will worsen climate impacts in the Pacific.

In London, campaigners will deliver their message to State Bank of India offices on Friday morning London time, this evening Australian time.

As citizens rallied, youth climate strikers, climate action advocates, and prominent Professor of economics and former leader of the Liberal Party John Hewson publicly called on the State Bank of India to stand for climate action, not climate destruction, and rule out finance for the contested coal project.

Varsha Yajman, former School Striker and law student who addressed the Sydney rally, said “As a first-generation South-Asian Australian and school striker, I know what is at stake if the State Bank of India funds Adani’s climate-wrecking coal mine. It’s not just my future at risk, there are already millions of people impacted by climate disasters across India and Bangladesh. My family is from Bengaluru in South India, a place that used to be called the Garden City. That is not the case anymore. There has been a 60% decrease in rainfall over the past 10 years and the temperature has risen by almost 13% in the past 20. I worry about the impact of water crises and extreme heat on my family. As India battles the coronavirus pandemic, it is outrageous that public money should be given to a billionaire for a dangerous coal project. The State Bank needs to confirm that they are not involved in this loan.”

Dr. John Hewson, former leader of the Liberal Party, former Director of Macquarie Bank, and Professor in the Crawford School of Public Policy at the ANU said, “Adani’s Australian operations are already drowning in debt as financial institutions increasingly shun the toxic project which will have disastrous environmental impacts. Funding Adani’s climate disaster would be an extremely risky move, the economics of the project simply don’t stack up. Proper due diligence on this loan would reveal that any public loan to Adani’s coal project is an irresponsible idea. I recognize that State Bank may feel that they are operating in India’s national interest, but handing out public funds for Adani’s coal project would be risky given the urgent global need to reduce emissions, and especially for a project that is destined to become a stranded asset.”

Claire Galvin, a 19-year-old from North Queensland, said: “As a young Queenslander who’s grown up in Cairns, I’ve watched the Great Barrier Reef suffer back-to-back mass coral bleaching events, caused by climate change. If Adani’s coal mine goes ahead, it will lock in decades of carbon pollution and our Reef and the tourism jobs that rely on it will suffer. That’s why I’m taking legal action along with other young people in Queensland to challenge Adani’s national environmental law approval. The State Bank of India must rule out funding Adani’s coal project. At a time when India wants to phase out imported coal, it’s ridiculous to hand out public money to climate-wrecking coal mines.”

89 companies have committed to not supporting Adani’s coal project, including some of the world’s largest banks and insurers. The State Bank of India is now at risk of using public funds to finance a project the private sector has shunned, with Indian taxpayers footing the bill.

Adani claims delivering ‘jobs commitments’ amidst allegations of ‘abusing Aboriginal rights’

16 September 2020 Carmichael Coal Mine, Queensland - Photo: Cameron Laird
Photo: Supplied by Adani Australia

By Neeraj Nanda

MELBOURNE, 18 September 2020: Adani Australia, developing the Carmichael Coal Project in Queensland has claimed to employ more than 1,500 people and awarding more than $1.5 billion in contracts on the Carmichael mine and rail project. The claim comes amidst the company facing charges of abusing Aboriginal rights again by the Wagan Jagalingon Family Council (W &J). They have made a human rights complaint with the Qld Commissioner.

Adani Australia a statement emailed to South Asia Times (SAT) today quotes it’s CEO David Boshoff as saying, “We are proud to have made good on our promises to Queensland, and especially regional Queensland. We’ve created more than 1,500 jobs and signed more than $1.5 billion in contracts.

More than 88% of our contracts are being delivered in Queensland and have been spread across all corners of the state to give as many regions as possible the opportunity to benefit from our project, while also enabling us to tap into the highly-skilled construction and resources industry workforce that Queensland possesses.

The project’s contractors and suppliers are from almost every corner of the state.”

W&J cultural leader, Adrian Burragubba says, “We are harmed – spiritually, culturally and physically – by the desecration and destruction of our land for the Carmichael mine. We are peacefully camping in our homeland practicing our laws and culture. But Adani sends in its security force and calls in the police to intervene”.

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Traditional owners protest. Photo- Supplied.

A confident CEO David Boshoff says, “We are looking forward to the day next year when we can celebrate our success with our Queensland partners and employees while watching the first shipment of coal being exported. Until then, it remains full speed ahead on construction,” he said.

Adani’s project: Greed over planet (Video interview- Geoff Law, Editor, Adani Watch)

Tussle Between Those Who Want to Save the Planet and Greedy Corporates
Adani’s project: Greed over
The issue has become an international one, says Geoff Law, Editor, Adani Watch, a website that is part of an initiative of the Bob Brown Foundation, in an exclusive interview with Newsclick.

Source: Newsclick

Protesters lock themselves to machinery to halt work starting at the Adani coal mine

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By SAT News Desk

MELBOURNE, 25 October: The anti-Adani coal mine stir today took a dramatic turn with several people attaching themselves to construction machinery, vowing to continue the protest against the coal mine in Central Queensland. The protest, says a media release, stopped the work for many hours.

Supported by over a dozen people, one person got attached to a front-end loader, another to an excavator and a third person attached themselves to a grader, stopping construction work.

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The protest action took place where the state development area crosses the Gregory Highway, approximately 35km / 25 minutes south of the Belyando Roadhouse.

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“I’m scared about my children’s future. I think our government is seriously underestimating the potentially devastating impacts of climate change. Now is the time to take a stand. I’m an ordinary person taking extraordinary action to stop this mine.” said, Gail Hamilton, an engineer and former council employee from Townsville.

“My granddaughter has just turned five, I’m here to Stop Adani and protect the environment and our water for her future,” said fellow protestor Susanne Rix, from the Blue Mountains.

“I could not sit idly by and let Adani begin work. This is the line in the sand for me and thousands of people from all walks of life who will take peaceful direct action to stop this mine,” said John Brinnand, a retired psychiatrist from the Sunshine Coast.

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The mine would be one of the greatest coal mines in the world, releasing billions of tonnes of carbon pollution into the atmosphere. The Great Barrier Reef would be badly affected, already facing large-scale blenching due to rising ocean temperatures, caused by climate change.

Recent polling indicates that the majority of Australians do not support the mine. Despite this, the Queensland and Federal Governments are gearing up to hand Adani Australia a $1 billion taxpayer-subsidized loan for the project. 

All photos: Front Line Action on Coal (FLAC), Australia.

Nod to Adani coal project: Greenpeace thunders, “Don’t assume this is end of story”

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By Our Correspondent

In one of its strongest warnings to the Adani Group, which has got environmental nod to go ahead with the Carmichael coal mining project in Australia, the world’s most influential green campaigners, Greenpeace, has said, “Don’t assume this is the end of the story. The Carmichael mine cannot go ahead without the financial support of one the big four Australian banks. Greenpeace will make sure every Australian knows that any bank cutting a cheque for Carmichael is making possible a monster mine that will endanger our Reef and our climate.”
The warning came close on the heels of the Australian government’s decision to approve the Adani Group’s controversial A$16.5 billion ($15.5 billion) Carmichael coal and rail project in Queensland. Approved subject to strict conditions to protect groundwater, the Carmichael mine project could become Australia’s largest coal mine at 60 million tonnes a year amidst protests from green groups and marine tour operators, who are worried about carbon pollution and export of the coal from a port near the Great Barrier Reef.
“Carmichael coal mine’s impacts will be felt for generations”, Ben Pearson, Australia-Pacific programme director for Greenpeace, has said, adding, the project was approved despite the fact that Adani Group had “a dirty track record (pdf) n India”, where it “has been investigated and fined for illegally building on villagers’ land and destroying protected mangrove areas.”
Pearson recalled, “An investigation by the Karnataka anti-corruption ombudsman exposed Adani Enterprises’ active involvement in large-scale illegal exports of iron ore at its port, resulting in ‘huge’ economic losses to the Government. Documents seized from Adani’s offices revealed the company was paying cash bribes to port officials, customs, police and local pollies in exchange for ‘undue favour for illegal exports’.”
The decision was also taken, according to the Greenpeace exe, “despite global investors like Deutsche Bank and HSBC refusing to fund the mine’s associated coal port… They pledged to stay away from the project because they felt their reputation was at risk. Surely, if a German bank can see that these projects have an unacceptable impact on the Reef, Australia’s Environment Minister should be able too. And given the uncertainty about whether Carmichael will ever go ahead — and thus the new terminal — it just makes no sense to give it a tick.”
Pearson, whose reaction has been posted on the Greenpeace site, said he had “hoped” Greg Hunt, Environment Minister, “would stand up to the coal industry and reject the plea for environmental clearance. “Minister Hunt had the simple task of rejecting absurd proposals for the biggest coal mine ever proposed for Australia — the Carmichael mine — which requires a new coal export terminal and destructive dredging and dumping in our beloved Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. But for whatever reason, Hunt couldn’t do it”, he said.
“Made up of six open-cut pits and five underground mines, Carmichael mine will cover an area seven times that of Sydney Harbour. The only way to get coal out of Carmichael mine is via the Great Barrier Reef. Millions of tonnes of seabed will have to be dredged and dumped in the World Heritage Area to make way for port expansions to service this mega-mine”, said Pearson, adding, “Hunt gave the go-ahead to port expansions despite warnings from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and UNESCO that the developments would place the World Heritage Area ‘in danger’.”
“Hunt approved Carmichael mine against independent expert advice that the mine could dry up endangered springs and drain sections of the Great Artesian Basin. The outback mine, which is located in a drought-prone farming area, requires a whopping 12 billion litres of water every year (pdf)”, the Greenpeace activist said, adding, “With this decision, the political system failed to protect the Great Barrier Reef, the global climate and our national interest”.
Source: Counterview