Tag: CARMICHAEL mine

‘Stop Adani’ activists protest outside Pacific National and Aurizon’s head offices

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Photo: Stop Adani

By SAT News Desk

Brisbane/Sydney, December 9: Big crowds rallied outside Pacific National and Aurizon’s head offices this morning, delivering huge piles of coal, singing coal-themed Christmas carols and calling on the rail freight companies to rule out hauling coal for Adani’s controversial Carmichael coal mine.

Today big crowds rallied outside Aurizon and Pacific National headquarters in Brisbane and Sydney, delivering giant piles of coal, with singing, chanting and train whistles, demanding that the coal freighting companies say no to hauling Carmichael coal for Adani.

Queensland spokesperson, Dermot Dorgan, #StopAdani The Gap said, that any association with the Carmichael mine is a reputational risk and that hauling coal for Adani would be a climate train wreck.

“With Genesee and Wyoming recently ruling out hauling Adani’s coal, two companies remain Aurizon and Pacific National,” Mr. Dorgan said.

“More than 60 major companies globally have already said no to supporting Adani’s project because of climate impacts and the associated business risks. We’re urging Aurizon and Pacific National to do the same,” Mr. Dorgan said.

Sydney spokesperson, Vicky Tzioumis, #StopAdani North Sydney said, “Companies like Pacific National that choose to associate with Adani’s controversial brand endanger their reputation and social license.

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Photo: Stop Adani

“Adani’s mine, rail, and the port project is a risky financial bet. Adani has shortchanged major engineering companies for tens of millions of dollars and experts say Adani is a “corporate collapse waiting to happen”.

“Australia is already grappling with early bushfires and devastating droughts. Burning coal is the biggest driver of climate change. Aurizon and Pacific National must stand on the right side of history and rule out hauling Adani’s coal,” Ms. Tzioumis said.

Text-Supplied.

Carmichael mine will be self-financed, says Adani Mining CEO Lucas Dow

By Neeraj Nanda

MELBOURNE, 30 November: The controversial Carmichael coal mine and rail project in Queensland will be 100% financed through the Adani Group’s resources, Adani Mining CEO Lucas Dow announced yesterday in Central Queensland.

The project has faced fierce opposition from environmental groups who claim carbon emissions from the mine will badly hurt the nearby iconic Great Barrier Reef, already facing destruction from global warming.

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Adani Australia CEO Lucas Dow. Photo: Adani Mining Twitter

In an Adani Mining media release, Dow says, “We have already invested $3.3 billion in Adani’s Australian businesses, which is a clear demonstration of our capacity to deliver a financing solution for the revised scope of the mine and rail project.

“The project stacks up both environmentally and financially.
“Today’s announcement removes any doubt as to the project stacking up financially,” he says.

The media release claims, “The Carmichael Project will deliver more than 1,500 direct jobs on the mine and rail projects during the initial ramp-up and construction phase, and will support thousands more indirect jobs, all of which will benefit regional Queensland communities.”

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Photo: Greenpeace Australia

Meanwhile, in a media release, the Wangan & Jagalingou Traditional Owners Council says, “‘They don’t have our consent, they can’t build their mine.

“We demand a guarantee from the Queensland Government they won’t now extinguish our native title for Adani. Queensland Labor has said they recognize that the registration of the Adani ILUA is contested and they acknowledge and respect our right to have our complaints considered and determined by a court.

“We have an appeal before the full bench of the Federal Court. To act before this concludes would be to deny our rights and open the way for a grave injustice. Without our consent, the mine is not ready to proceed”.

There has sprung a strong lobby group against the mine. Their concerns are the damaging impact of the mine on the Great Barrier Reef, on groundwater at the site, greenhouse emissions, and extinction of already endangered species. Mackay Conservation Group has already won its legal challenge on the last issue.

Adani’s ‘ironclad’ guarantee against 457 visas for Carmichael mine but opposition wants written commitment

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Gautam Adani. Photo: Twitter

By SAT News Desk

Melbourne, 6 December: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszuk has said she had an “ironclad” guarantee from Gautam Adani that there will be no foreign workers brought under the 457 visas for the $ 16.5 billion Carmichael coal mine project. Though there is no written agreement on it. The Queensland Premier announced this after a meeting with the Adani Group boss in Townsville today. Mr. Adani, considered close to the Indian Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi had yesterday met the Australian Prime Minister Malcom Turnbull at a private meeting and briefed him the project details.

ABC reports Queensand Opposition Leader Tim Nicholls said written assurances would be preferable.

“The Premier has said she takes Mr Adani at this word and that’s fine, but I would have thought it would have been better to assure Queenslanders that we had some written commitments that jobs from this project will go to Queenslanders,” he said.

The Adani group today announced five regional towns will provide vital support services for the projects.
In a media release the Chief Executive of Adani Australian, Jeyakumar Janakaraj, said Emerald, Clermont, Moranbah, Collinsville and Charters Towers would be the source of support services including workers for its projects.
 “We are particularly focusing on the construction of our planned near-400km rail line to be constructed between the Carmichael mine and our bulk port facility at Abbott Point near Bowen,” Mr Janakaraj said.
 “So we need people and services in the region to build that rail link, as well as companies to provide resources.”
 The provision of good, services and labour from the regional towns would be supplemented by Rockhampton, Mackay and Townsville.
 Mr Janakaraj said Adani had also announced that Townsville would be the site of the Regional Headquarters for the Carmichael coal mine project.
 Mr Janakaraj said Townsville would also be home base for the company’s Project Management Office, and provide port services for incoming materials.
The original plan of the company was to have the project offices in Brisbane.

The Australian Conservation Foundation yesterday calling it a dirty deal said, “This coal mine would be a global climate catastrophe. It is dangerous to our planet and the people and places we love. Australians don’t want this mine, we want our reef and a clean, safe future. 
Malcom Turnbull has a clear choice. Honour an iron clad election promise or do a dirty deal with Adani to use Australian taxpayers’ money to fund a coal-carting railway line from the Galilee Basin to the Great Barrier Reef coast.”

Meanwhile, in a media statement the Wangan & Jagalingou Traditional Owners Council has announced a fresh court action against the proposed project after expressing anger at Mr. Gautam Adani not meeting them.

Adani Coal mine approval: Environmentalists fume, business happy

Bowen Basin - feature

By Neeraj Nanda

Melbourne, 30 July: The recent environmental approval of the proposed controversial Carmichael Coal Mine and rail link in Queensland has drawn reactions on expected lines. The environment lobby is fuming while business circles have welcomed the go ahead to the world’s biggest Coal mine.
In a Adani Australia media statement from Brisbane, Adani Chairman Gautam Adani has said the approval of the mine and rail project “…is a step closer to delivering our multi-million dollar mine, rail and port development.”
“Adani’s commitment to nation-building in India goes hand-in-hand with its commitment to providing sustainable employment opportunities for local workers and suppliers, not just through our rail infrastructure , but also our long-term investments in ports and mining,” Mr. Adani said.
Greenpeace, has said, “Don’t assume this is the end of the story. The Carmichael mine cannot go ahead without the financial support of one the big four Australian banks. Greenpeace will make sure every Australian knows that any bank cutting a cheque for Carmichael is making possible a monster mine that will endanger our Reef and our climate.”
“Carmichael coal mine’s impacts will be felt for generations”, Ben Pearson, Australia-Pacific programme director for Greenpeace, has said, adding, the project was approved despite the fact that Adani Group had “a dirty track record (pdf) n India”, where it “has been investigated and fined for illegally building on villagers’ land and destroying protected mangrove areas.”
Pearson, whose reaction has been posted on the Greenpeace site, said he had “hoped” Greg Hunt, Environment Minister, “would stand up to the coal industry and reject the plea for environmental clearance. “Minister Hunt had the simple task of rejecting absurd proposals for the biggest coal mine ever proposed for Australia — the Carmichael mine — which requires a new coal export terminal and destructive dredging and dumping in our beloved Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. But for whatever reason, Hunt couldn’t do it”, he said.
“Hunt approved Carmichael mine against independent expert advice that the mine could dry up endangered springs and drain sections of the Great Artesian Basin. The outback mine, which is located in a drought-prone farming area, requires a whopping 12 billion litres of water every year (pdf)”, the Greenpeace activist said, adding, “With this decision, the political system failed to protect the Great Barrier Reef, the global climate and our national interest”, he said.
Tim Buckley, Director of Energy Finance Studies, Australasia, for the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) has spent many years studying the economic viability of energy projects and companies, with a particular focus on the Galilee basin projects.
“It’s not surprising that Minister Hunt is going along with Premier Newman and Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s desire to facilitate foreign firms in their efforts to try to prop up Australia’s declining coal industry,” Mr Buckley said.
“Ironically, if this project proceeds, it will actually accelerate the longer term destruction of Australia’s coal export industry by dramatically expanding the capital invested whilst at the same time driving coal prices down globally.
“Global coal prices are already depressed due to excess supply. If the Carmichael project proceeds, it will potentially open up access to another nine mine proposals with a combined thermal coal capacity of up to 300 million tonnes per annum. Our analysis forecasts that this would drive down thermal coal export prices a further 10-20%, thereby squeezing coal sector profit margins which are already down to zero,” Mr Buckley said.
Meanwhile, in an Email statement, Ravi Bhatia President of the Australia India Business Council (Victoria) says, “…the project involving the largest coal mines in Australia and the related logistical and will transportation infrastructure is a major success for the Adani Group. This project will also contribute towards feeding massive thermal power projects in India, particularly in Mundra SEZ in Gujarat, thereby helping to alleviate power shortages in India.
Later, talking to SAT, Mr. Bhatia said, “there is always variation in commodity prices in the international market, Coal was high two years ago, now it is cheap.
“The net effort of low price in market is it makes it harder to get financing for the project. However, low prices are temporary phenomena. One knows to live with it,” he said.
While agreeing environment issues were important, Mr. Bhatia asked, “Can anyone can tell me of technologies that can help us achieve the objective of more energy at a special faster rate than Coal?
“If we wish to lift the standard of living in India and remove poverty we need more energy,” he said.

- SAT News Service

Nod to Adani coal project: Greenpeace thunders, “Don’t assume this is end of story”

coking coal

By Our Correspondent

In one of its strongest warnings to the Adani Group, which has got environmental nod to go ahead with the Carmichael coal mining project in Australia, the world’s most influential green campaigners, Greenpeace, has said, “Don’t assume this is the end of the story. The Carmichael mine cannot go ahead without the financial support of one the big four Australian banks. Greenpeace will make sure every Australian knows that any bank cutting a cheque for Carmichael is making possible a monster mine that will endanger our Reef and our climate.”
The warning came close on the heels of the Australian government’s decision to approve the Adani Group’s controversial A$16.5 billion ($15.5 billion) Carmichael coal and rail project in Queensland. Approved subject to strict conditions to protect groundwater, the Carmichael mine project could become Australia’s largest coal mine at 60 million tonnes a year amidst protests from green groups and marine tour operators, who are worried about carbon pollution and export of the coal from a port near the Great Barrier Reef.
“Carmichael coal mine’s impacts will be felt for generations”, Ben Pearson, Australia-Pacific programme director for Greenpeace, has said, adding, the project was approved despite the fact that Adani Group had “a dirty track record (pdf) n India”, where it “has been investigated and fined for illegally building on villagers’ land and destroying protected mangrove areas.”
Pearson recalled, “An investigation by the Karnataka anti-corruption ombudsman exposed Adani Enterprises’ active involvement in large-scale illegal exports of iron ore at its port, resulting in ‘huge’ economic losses to the Government. Documents seized from Adani’s offices revealed the company was paying cash bribes to port officials, customs, police and local pollies in exchange for ‘undue favour for illegal exports’.”
The decision was also taken, according to the Greenpeace exe, “despite global investors like Deutsche Bank and HSBC refusing to fund the mine’s associated coal port… They pledged to stay away from the project because they felt their reputation was at risk. Surely, if a German bank can see that these projects have an unacceptable impact on the Reef, Australia’s Environment Minister should be able too. And given the uncertainty about whether Carmichael will ever go ahead — and thus the new terminal — it just makes no sense to give it a tick.”
Pearson, whose reaction has been posted on the Greenpeace site, said he had “hoped” Greg Hunt, Environment Minister, “would stand up to the coal industry and reject the plea for environmental clearance. “Minister Hunt had the simple task of rejecting absurd proposals for the biggest coal mine ever proposed for Australia — the Carmichael mine — which requires a new coal export terminal and destructive dredging and dumping in our beloved Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area. But for whatever reason, Hunt couldn’t do it”, he said.
“Made up of six open-cut pits and five underground mines, Carmichael mine will cover an area seven times that of Sydney Harbour. The only way to get coal out of Carmichael mine is via the Great Barrier Reef. Millions of tonnes of seabed will have to be dredged and dumped in the World Heritage Area to make way for port expansions to service this mega-mine”, said Pearson, adding, “Hunt gave the go-ahead to port expansions despite warnings from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority and UNESCO that the developments would place the World Heritage Area ‘in danger’.”
“Hunt approved Carmichael mine against independent expert advice that the mine could dry up endangered springs and drain sections of the Great Artesian Basin. The outback mine, which is located in a drought-prone farming area, requires a whopping 12 billion litres of water every year (pdf)”, the Greenpeace activist said, adding, “With this decision, the political system failed to protect the Great Barrier Reef, the global climate and our national interest”.
Source: Counterview