Tag: cinema

The magic of cinema will never fade away: Shoojit Sircar & Ronnie Lahiri

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Photo- MBF

By Neeraj Nanda

MELBOURNE, 18 June 2020: Director Shoojit Sarkar and Producer Ronnie Lahairi whose Amitabh Bachchan, Ayushmann Khurana starrer is making global waves on the streaming service Amazon Prime, remain committed to the magic of cinema which they feel will never fade away.

The two cinema icons were recently participating in the inaugural IFFM Film Club on Zoom organized by the Indian Film Festival of Melbourne 2020, and hosted by Rajeev Masand. Their film Gulabo Sitabo is one of the first mainstream Indian movies to release exclusively on a streaming service.

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Rajeev Masand, Mitu Bhowmick Lange, Shoojit Sircar & Ronnie Lahiri. Photos- MBF

Answering to a question by SAT Editor, Neeraj Nanda, Saoojit Sarkar said, “The magic of cinema will never fade away. When the lockdown opens up, it is normal human behavior to watch something at a stadium, a tennis match, cricket or a movie in a cinema. This because human behavior is to come together and cinema magic will remain.”

“And, of course, streaming services being a new evolution will co-exist with cinema, he said.

Ronnie Lahari said, “We are a community of people and enjoy when we are with a lot of people. That’s not happening when you are watching on a streaming service. These are unrepresented times and we took a decision to release Gulabo Sitabi on the basis of the current situation.”

“It’s not that all our films will be on streaming services. As soon as the lockout opens I will be happy to release my next film on the big screen where everyone can watch it together,” he said.

The IFFM Film Club interview and interaction with Saoojit Sarkar & Ronnie Lahari event on zoom on the eve of the release of Gulabo Sitabo attracted massive participation from across Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Malaysia, and Indonesia. Host Rajeev Masand’s penetrating questions and interesting questions from participants added to the glory of the unusual but lively and informative interaction. Kudos to IFFM CEO Mitu Bhowmick Lange and the Mind Blowing Films team for this exceptional digital experience. SEE FULL VIDEO BELOW:

Bombay Talkies Exhibition in Melbourne from 8 February

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Photo: ACMI

Indian cinema journey from silent to sound – 1920s to 1940s

By SAT Arts Desk

MELBOURNE, 10 January: For those who are Indian cinema buffs an exhibition treat called ‘Bombay Talkies’ will take place from 8 Feb to 2 July 2017 at the acmi Museum at the Federation Square, city. One can experience the excitement and glamour of Indian cinema from 1920s – 1940s.

For the very first time, the free Bombay Talkies exhibition will showcase the treasure-trove that is the Dietze Family Trust archive, a Melbourne-based collection of more than 3,000 cultural artefacts gathered from the legendary Indian film studio, Bombay Talkies.

This extraordinary archive, which traces Indian cinema’s journey from silent film to sound, represents the most comprehensive collection of 1920s to 1940s Indian film studio ephemera in the world.

Entrepreneurial filmmaker Himansu Rai (1892−1940) and his movie-star wife Devika Rani (1908−1994) played a crucial role in the development of mainstream Bombay cinema. After creating landmark silent films in the 1920s based on traditional Indian stories, which were largely seen in Europe, they turned their attention to home.

As co-founders of the legendary Bombay Talkies film studio, they aimed to make films about contemporary India that would speak to a wide audience.

Running for 20 years and releasing 40 films, Bombay Talkies was one of India’s most innovative and highly resourced movie studios. It is credited with introducing the musical narrative structure that characterises modern Bollywood, and launched the careers of several prominent Indian film industry luminaries including superstars Ashok Kumar (1911–2001) and Leela Chitnis (1909-2003).

Asia TOPA is a joint initiative of the Sidney Myer Fund and Arts Centre Melbourne and is supported by the Australian and Victorian Governments.

Source: ACMI, Melbourne