Tag: ICC

ICC Men’s T20 World Cup in Australia 2020 postponed

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Photo- ICC

- Windows for the next three ICC Men’s events agreed to support the rescheduling of bilateral
cricket
- ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2023 moved to October – November 2023 to allow longer
qualification period

By SAT News Desk

MELBOURNE, 20 JULY 2020: he International Cricket Council (ICC) today confirmed the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup in Australia 2020 has been postponed due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

At today’s meeting of the IBC Board (the commercial subsidiary of the ICC), windows for the next three ICC men’s events were also agreed to bring clarity to the calendar and give the sport the best possible opportunity over the next three years to recover from the disruption caused by COVID-19.

The windows for the Men’s events are:

ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2021 will be held October – November 2021 with the final on 14 November 2021
ICC Men’s T20 World Cup 2022 will be held October – November 2022 with the final on 13 November 2022
ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2023 will be held in India October – November 2023 with the final on 26 November 2023

The IBC Board agreed to continue to monitor the rapidly changing situation and assess all the information available in order to make a considered decision on future hosts to ensure the sport is able to stage safe and successful global events in 2021 and 2022.

The IBC Board will also continue to evaluate the situation in relation to being able to stage the ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2021 in New Zealand in February next year. In the meantime, planning for this event continues as scheduled.

ICC Chief Executive Manu Sawhney said: “We have undertaken a comprehensive and complex contingency planning exercise and through this process, our number one priority has been to protect the health and safety of everyone involved in the sport.

“The decision to postpone the ICC Men’s T20 World Cup was taken after careful consideration of all of the options available to us and gives us the best possible opportunity of delivering two safe and successful T20 World Cups for fans around the world.

“Our members now have the clarity they need around event windows to enable them to reschedule lost bilateral and domestic cricket. Moving the Men’s Cricket World Cup to a later window is a critical element of this and gives us a better chance of maintaining the integrity of the qualification process. This additional time will be used to reschedule games that might be lost because of the pandemic ensuring qualification can be decided on the field of play.

“Throughout this process, we have worked closely with our key stakeholders including governments, Members, broadcasters, partners and medical experts to enable us to reach a collective decision for the good of the game and our fans. I would like to thank everyone involved for their commitment to a safe return to cricket.”

The IBC is the ICC Business Corporation FZ LLC and is the commercial subsidiary of the ICC.
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No evidence of match-fixing during ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2011 final: ICC

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Alex Marshall – General Manager, ICC ACU PHoto- ICC

By SAT News Desk

Responding to allegations of corruption with regards to the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup 2011 final Anti-Corruption Unit General Manager Alex Marshall in a media release says:

“The ICC Integrity Unit has looked into the recent allegations regarding the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup Final 2011. At this time, we have not been presented with any evidence that supports the claims made or which would merit launching an investigation under the ICC Anti-Corruption Code. There is no record of any letter regarding this matter sent by the then Sri Lanka Sports Minister to the ICC and senior ICC staff at the time have confirmed they have no recollection of receiving any such letter which would have led to an investigation. We have no reason to doubt the integrity of the ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup Final 2011.

“We take all allegations of this nature extremely seriously and should we receive any evidence to corroborate the claims, we will review our current position.

“If anyone has any evidence that this match or any other has been subject to match-fixing, we would urge them to get in contact with the ICC Integrity team.”

How Cricket can deal with racism & promote greater equality within itself

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Photo- ICC Media Zone

By SAT Sports Desk/ICC Media Zone

The latest edition of the International Cricket Council’s (ICC) online series Interviews Inside Out released today, takes a look at the diversity of the game, challenges players face, and what the cricket family can do to commit fully to anti-racism.

Moderated by former West Indies fast bowler and broadcaster Ian Bishop, Interviews Inside Out featured a full and frank discussion on diversity and racism in cricket with two-time ICC Men’s T20 World Cup-winning captain of the West Indies team – Daren Sammy, former ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup and T20 World Cup winner from England and broadcaster – Isa Guha, former South Africa all-rounder – JP Duminy, two-time ICC Men’s Cricket World Cup winner with Australia and leading coach -Tom Moody, and former Pakistan player and broadcaster – Bazid Khan.

Each of the panelists shared their personal experiences on the subject and spoke of solutions that could help create a more inclusive space within the sport. They unanimously agreed on the fact that there is a need for more conversations at multiple levels and more ownership to make a difference in the sport.

Daren Sammy said, “There is a need for education at a systematic level. Just as there is an emphasis on education around anti-doping or anti-corruption, the same emphasis must be given to educating the youth on anti-racism in order to help young cricketers understand diversity in cricket and adapt early on.”

Isa Guha said, “We have a real opportunity with cricket because it does cross different races, backgrounds, and religions, and does bring all of these different people together. It is really a sport that unites everyone. I mean, look at the current England (men’s) team, we stumbled upon this team that is so diverse. But the most important thing for me is representation. This team represents the UK, so people from Muslim communities, black communities can look at these guys and say, they’ve managed to do it, so can I. The other thing I am proud of, about this team is their intention to learn a lot about each other’s cultures. That for me undoubtedly has led to their success. It was similar for us, Ebony (Ebony Rainford-Brent) and I in the 2009 ICC World Cup.”

Tom Moody said, “Leaders in our cricket community whether it is a captain, senior player, a coach or an administrator, we have an enormous responsibility as an educator along with many different platforms. One of those platforms I think that has been neglected and not given the attention that is required and that is the understanding of the different levels of racism that exists within the game. If there is anything positive that has come out of this, is that it is highlighting that we need to be a lot more understanding of how we can make this better as individuals. From my personal experiences have always enjoyed the challenges of working in different cultures and environments. To learn from these as against resisting the challenges of those different environments.”

Whilst making his closing remarks Ian Bishop added, “There is no one here who is demanding a free gift, we all work very diligently and very hard and what we want to see is equality across the globe and an equal chance for everyone.”

WATCH VIDEO HERE

CRICKET: ICC bans use of saliva to shine the ball; allows home umpires in international series

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Photo: ICC

By SAT News Desk/ICC Media Zone

MELBOURNE, 10 June 2020: The ICC Chief Executives’ Committee (CEC) ratified recommendations from the Anil Kumble-led Cricket Committee, aimed at mitigating the risks posed by the COVID-19 virus and protect the safety of players and match officials when cricket resumes.

COVID-19 Replacements: Teams will be allowed to replace players displaying symptoms of COVID-19 during a Test match. In line with concussion replacements, the Match Referee will approve the nearest like-for-like replacement.

However, the regulation for COVID-19 replacements will not be applicable in ODIs and T20Is.

Ban on applying saliva to the ball: Players will not be permitted to use saliva to shine the ball. If a player does apply saliva to the ball, the umpires will manage the situation with some leniency during an initial period of adjustment for the players, but subsequent instances will result in the team receiving a warning.

A team can be issued up to two warnings per innings but repeated use of saliva on the ball will result in a 5-run penalty to the batting side. Whenever saliva is applied to the ball, the umpires will be instructed to clean the ball before play recommences.

Non-neutral umpires: The requirement to appoint neutral match officials will be temporarily removed from the playing conditions for all international formats owing to the current logistical challenges with international travel. The ICC will be able to appoint locally based match officials from the Emirates ICC Elite Panel of Match Officials and the Emirates ICC International Panel of Match Officials.

Additional DRS reviews: The CEC has also confirmed an additional unsuccessful DRS review for each team in each innings of a match, keeping in mind that there may be less experienced umpires on duty at times. This will increase the number of unsuccessful appeals per innings for each team to three for Tests and two for the white-ball formats.

The ICC Cricket Operations team will support Match Referees when processing Code of Conduct breaches, and a neutral Elite Panel match referee will conduct any hearing remotely via video link.

An earlier media release on the recommendations of the Cricket Committee and details on appointment of match officials is available here.

Additional logo allowed: Meanwhile, the CEC has also approved a relaxation of rules on apparel logos for the next 12 months.

A logo, not exceeding 32 square inches in size, may be placed on the chest of the Test match shirt and sweater in addition to the three other logos allowed as per regulations. As of now, logos on chests are only allowed in ODIs and T20Is.

ICC issues guidelines for the safe resumption of cricket as Coronavirus restrictions relax

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By SAT News Desk/ICC Media Zone

MELBOURNE, 22 MARCH 2020: The International Cricket Council (ICC) has published guidelines for the safe resumption of cricket to assist its Members in restarting cricket activity in their countries as government restrictions owing to COVID-19 start to relax.

“ICC Back to Cricket Guidelines” is a comprehensive document developed by the ICC Medical Advisory Committee in consultation with Member Medical Representatives, and provides guidance for the safe resumption of community cricket, domestic professional cricket, and international cricket.

The guidelines do not provide answers to when the game can resume in different parts of the world, rather it provides a framework with practical suggestions on how members can resume cricket in a manner that protects against the risk of transmission of infection with the COVID-19 virus.

The ICC advises its Members to use these guidelines as the basis to create their own policies for return to cricket activity in compliance, in all cases, with local and national government regulations (which should always take precedence) and to ensure the cricket community applies the necessary safety measures when resuming cricket.

The complete document is available on the page HERE.